The Long Haul

THE LONG HAUL
8:50 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Pervasive Plastics A Problem For Fishermen

A bucket of debris Brodeur collected from Racing Beach in Falmouth. Nearly 80 percent of the items found on beaches came from land sources. The vast majority of those items are plastics.
Credit Sean Corcoran / WCAI

WGBH Radio is partnering with WCAI to focus on the future of New England's fishing industry in our series The Long Haul.

Marine debris is a big issue for fishermen - for environmental, monetary and practical reasons. Things like lost lobster pots, spools of microfilament and lengths of rope are almost all plastics - bad for the ecosystem and its fish.

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THE LONG HAUL
10:46 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Fishermen: Protected Seals Threatening Cod Population

Seals!
Credit ClintJCL / Flickr

With fewer fish and more regulations, you'd think it couldn't get much tougher for fishermen. But now they're also facing growing competition- not from other fishermen- but from federally protected seals.

All this week WGBH News is putting a focus on the tradeoffs in our waters, in our series made in partnership with WCAI on Cape Cod: The Long Haul: The Future of New England's Fisheries.

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THE LONG HAUL
8:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Steep Decline In Bait Fish Stocks A Concern For Fishermen

Credit Elspeth Hay / WCAI

This week, WGBH News is putting a focus on the tradeoffs in our waters in our series made in partnership with WCAI: Long Haul: the Future of New England's Fishing Industry.

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THE LONG HAUL
8:32 am
Tue July 9, 2013

How Cooperative Research Could Ease Tensions Between Fishermen, Regulators

Rhode Island fisherman Joel Hovanesian points to the bumper sticker he says he created.
Credit Heather Goldstone / WCAI

This week, WGBH News is putting a focus on New England's fisheries with the series Long Haul: the Future of New England's Fishing Industry. WGBH's science editor Heather Goldstone reports on tensions surrounding fishery management.

Tensions between fishermen and the scientists and managers that oversee their industry are more than just unpleasant. They actually affect the quality of fishery research and management.

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