Boston Public Radio

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Weekdays
Jim Braude, Margery Eagan

89.7 WGBH, Boston Public Radio, is a leading source for in-depth perspective and analysis of today's top issues.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:51 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Caplan: No Reason To Panic About Ebola Virus In The US — Yet

Jim Braude and Margery Eagan spoke to medical ethicist Art Caplan about why we shouldn't panic about the Ebola virus here in the US.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/waelder11/ / Flickr

On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed a person who took a commercial flight from Liberia to Dallas had been diagnosed with the Ebola virus. This is the first documented Ebola case within US borders. The next day it was reported the patient may have exposed five young children to the virus.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:21 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

BPR: Accountability, Ebola, And The Supreme Court

Secret Service director Julia Pierson enters a hearing room to answer questions before a closed meeting of the Senate homeland security committee in Washington. Today, Pierson appeared before a House committee to respond to questions about White House security breaches.
Credit Cliff Owen / AP via NPR
  • In light of recent events at the White House, we talk about accountability in high places
  • Boston Globe editor Brian McGrory goes over the local headlines with Jim and Margery .
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:20 pm
Wed October 1, 2014

Nicholas Kristof Explains How Small Acts of Charity Can Pack A Huge Punch

Nicholas Kristof speaks at the World Economic Forum in Davos in 2010.
Credit Monika Flueckiger / Wikimedia Commons

Take a quick glance around almost any parking lot in America, and you're sure to see at least one bumper sticker with the phrase oft-attributed to Gandhi: "Be the Change You Wish To See In The World." People yearn to make a difference in the world they live in. The million dollar question, however, is: how, exactly? 

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:51 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Boston Police Commissioner: 'We Don't Show Up Anymore With The Sticks And The Helmets'

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans talked about the militarization of police, and what he saw the night of the Boston Marathon bombing manhunt in Watertown.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/88013522@N04/ / Flickr

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans says the biggest threat on Boston's streets is a vicious cycle of gang violence.

The violence "has no meaning, and really destroys the structure of the city," Evans said in an appearance on Boston Public Radio.

Evans' department had a bit of promising news last week, when it announced shootings and violent crime were down 12 percent in 2014 from the previous summer. That still meant there were 84 shootings and 10 deaths from guns over June, July and August. Evans said drastic actions can lower rates of violent crime even further in the city, but more needs to be done than just removing guns from the streets.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:57 pm
Tue September 30, 2014

Lessons In Leadership From The Roosevelts

Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt in Hyde Park, New York in 1940.
Credit FDR Presidential Library and Museum / Flickr Creative Commons

When it seems like every day brings a new calamity or crisis, the past is a ripe place to look for leadership guidance. On Boston Public Radio, Harvard historian Nancy Koehn pointed to one particular political dynasty of yore -- the Roosevelts -- as a prime example of effective, committed leadership in troubled times.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
10:44 am
Tue September 30, 2014

BPR: Politics, Books, And The Police Commissioner

Credit Will Roseliep / WGBH News
  • John King joins us to discuss the Obama Administration, including Eric Holder's resignation, the ongoing response to ISIS, the midterm elections, and a new CNN poll that shows Americans favor air strikes. 
  • Wendy Murphy helps us dig into the complexities of California's new "Yes Means Yes" law, and we talk to you to see what you think.
  • Police Commissioner Bill Ev
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
5:13 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

Life Continues In Iraq As The Country Is "Pulled Apart"

Charles Sennott reports from northern Iraq.
Credit Tracey Shelton / GlobalPost

In the week since President Obama declared a relentless campaign against the Islamic State, 51 American-led airstrikes were launched into Syria and 28 in Iraq. Meanwhile, an hour's drive away from the frontlines, life continued as it always has.  

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:30 pm
Mon September 29, 2014

'It Seems Like Open Season On Black Boys'

The Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III looked at the difficulty of law enforcement when police forces don't reflect the racial and ethnic diversity of the communities they serve.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/robinlow/ / Flick

On Saturday, a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri was shot in the arm by two suspects who remain at large. That incident follows weeks of protest and outrage over the shooting death of Michael Brown — an African American — at the hands of white police officer Darren Wilson.

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Boston Public Radio Podcast
10:28 am
Mon September 29, 2014

BPR Checks In To Northern Iraq, Talks Politics, And All Revved Up.

The U.S. works closely with Iraqi Kurds, whose policemen form a line in this photo. But the U.S. labels a militant Kurdish group from Turkey, the PKK, a terrorist organization. A PKK supporter waves a yellow flag of the group's leader. Three separate Kurdish militias have rallied against the group calling itself the Islamic State.
Credit Safin Hamed / AFP/Getty Images via NPR
  • Charlie Sennott joins us from Northern Iraq to comment on  the current situation between the Kurds and ISIS, and the morale of the Iraqi people, as well as their hopes for the future.
  • We talk politics with Frank Phillips, the State House bureau chief for the Boston Globe; and Jennifer Nassour
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:37 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Emily's List: It's "High Season" For Election Cliches

Greater Boston and Beat The Press host Emily Rooney.
Credit WGBH News

Greater Boston host Emily Rooney joined Jim Braude and Margery Eagan this week for another installment of her weekly list of obsessions and observations, "Emily's List." An unexpected addition to the list: her thoughts on our new version of the "Emily's List" theme music. ("I don't get it," she says.)

The theme of this week's list? Phrases used (or, rather, overused) by both candidates and the media during elections. "We are at high season for cliches," Emily says. Notable examples include:

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:28 pm
Fri September 26, 2014

Turn Off Netflix, Get Off The Couch And Hear These Live Shows

Imaginary Pants performing at the Lilypad in Inman Square in Cambridge. The Lilypad is one Cambridge venue endorsed by A Celtic Sojourn host Brian O'Donovan.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/bsearles/ / Flickr

Brian O'Donovan wants you to remember a simple motto: "Live music: it's where it's at." O'Donovan is the host of WGBH' s A Celtic Sojourn, and in addition to his broadcast duties, O'Donovan makes a point to get out to hear music "three or four nights a week."

O'Donovan joined Jim Braude and Margery Eagan on Boston Public Radio to talk about upcoming shows he's excited about, with a focus on the Cambridge area. Here are a few he mentioned on the show.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
8:59 am
Fri September 26, 2014

BPR: Holder and Jeter Say Goodbye

BPR: Eric Holder and Derek Jeter say goodbye.
Credit Olivier Douliery / Getty Images via NPR

  • How deep can President Obama get into war without Congressional approval? Elizabeth Spahn, Professor of Law Emerita at New England Law Boston, walks us through this thorny issue.
  • Boston Globe Editor, Brian McGrory returns to update us on Eric Holder's resignation (and the speculations about who will replace him), Maria Sacchetti's reporting on immigration, and Derek Jeter's last game at Yankee Stadium.
  • Dan Shaughnessy stops by to talk about Derek Jeter's legacy in baseball.
  • Under The Radar's Callie Crossley discusses "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," Shonda Rhimes vs. Alessandra Stanley, the Holder resignation (and the Deval Patrick factor), as well as the Mary Bonuato Genius award.
  • Celtic Sojourn's Brian O'Donovan on why live music is where it's at, and where, exactly, to find it.
  • We open up the mic to Emily Rooney about the Tsarnaev trial, voting in church's and her List.
  • Finally we close our first week of the three hour show with Dann and Martha Paquette, founders of Pretty Things Beer and Ale Project, and our News Quiz.
BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:32 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

When It Comes To Reforming Public Schools, America's Greatest Asset Is Its "Citizen Power"

A student laughs while on a Citizen Schools field trip to Fidelity in Boston.
Credit Citizen Schools Photos / Flickr Creative Commons

Education in the United States is often called the "great equalizer." But now, more than ever, huge gaps are springing up between upper-income and lower-income students. 

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:18 pm
Thu September 25, 2014

Make The Most Of Your Daily Hour Of 'Good Brain Time'

Got decision fatigue? Harvard professor Michael Norton talked to Jim Braude and Margery Eagan about how and why we make decisions.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/gerrydincher/ / Flickr

Every day we make hundreds of decisions, from the mundane (cream with your coffee?) to the ridiculously complex (top ten One Direction songs, in order of emotional impact?). Retailers pride themselves on offering customers what they want, and that happens to be a range of exotic choices, from which shoppers can select that one, shining, perfect thing.

But choice can also confound us, and the only thing that makes our temperature rise faster than a tough decision is watching someone else's choice paralysis. Ever been behind someone in the Dunkin' Donuts line who can't decide whether to get a French Cruller or a Boston Creme?

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
8:34 am
Thu September 25, 2014

Millennials Marching, Mentoring, And Transforming Our Culture

Demonstrators gather near Columbus Circle before the start of the People's Climate March in New York this past Sunday.
Credit Craig Ruttle / AP via NPR Berlin
  • Does Charlie Baker have a "sweetheart" problem or do we have a double standard problem? We check in with you to see what you think.
  • WGBH News' Science Editor Heather Goldstone gives us her analysis of the UN Summit on Climate Change.
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:41 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

What Makes The Khorasan Group An "Imminent" Threat To The U.S.?

Lt. Gen. William C. Mayville speaks during Pentagon briefing Monday about air strikes in Syria.
Credit Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images via NPR

After conducting airstrikes this past weekend against ISIS targets in Syria, the Pentagon announced it would also be going after another, as they described it, "imminent" threat to the United States: the Khorasan Group, an al-Qaeda splinter cell virtually unknown to the American public before the announcement.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:10 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

A Curtain-Raiser For Andris Nelsons And The Boston Symphony Orchestra Season

The BSO kicks off its first program of the season with Andris Nelsons on Saturday. WCRB hosts Brian McCreath and Ron Della Chiesa previewed the show.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

The Andris Nelsons era is about to begin in Boston. The Boston Symphony Orchestra's first full season under Nelsons starts Saturday, when the music director conducts Wagner, Puccini, Mascagni and Respighi at Symphony Hall.

"I knew there was something special about the guy within the first 10 minutes of rehearsal. And it was clear he had the orchestra's attention as well," BSO managing director Mark Volpe said in an interview with 99.5 WCRB's Brian McCreath.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
1:36 pm
Wed September 24, 2014

What Do You Have To Lose? Picking Up Smoking At Eighty Years Old

Singer-songwriter recently owned up to becoming a smoker again at 80 years old. Medical ethicist Art Caplan discussed getting older and doing what you want.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen announced he's started to smoke cigarettes again at the age of 80. With average male life expectancy in the US currently hovering at 76, Cohen has surpassed the mark and decided to focus on his happiness.

"If I had taken my doctor's advice and quit smoking when he advised me to, I wouldn't have lived to go to his funeral," cigar smoker George Burns famously quipped. When is it okay to ignore medical advice and just focus on being happy?

On Boston Public Radio, medical ethicist Art Caplan said his thinking runs counter to conventional medical wisdom. "I happen to agree with Leonard Cohen," Caplan said.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
8:52 am
Wed September 24, 2014

BPR: New Hampshire Politics, The BSO, And The Power Of The LGBT Vote

Andris Nelsons takes the helm of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
Credit Boston Symphony Orchestra
  • The bad news has been piling on lately. We chat about feelings of hopeless, and check in with you to see how you're feeling. 
  • Andrew Cline, Editorial editor for the New Hampshire Union Leader on the Shaheen/Brown Senate race. He helps us follow the money, and talks about what politicians are testing this year in New Hampshire.
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Boston Public Radio Podcast
5:14 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

Jim And Margery Ask This Old House

Kevin O'Connor, Host of This Old House

Today Jim Braude and Margery Eagan  marked the 35th season of This Old House with the show's host Kevin O'Connor and their resident plumbing, heating and cooling expert Richard Trethewey.  

Kevin and Richard were good enough to take Jim and Margery's home improvement questions, as well as  calls from listeners.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:47 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

Lynch and Capuano, Divided About Arming Syria

Syrian rebel fighters in the northern city of Aleppo in August. The Obama administration has been vetting rebel groups and decided that more than a dozen are moderate enough to arm.
Credit Zein al-Rifai / AFP/Getty Images via NPR

Boston Public Radio’s Jim Braude and Magery Eagan spoke to both Congressman Michael Capuano (7th district) and Stephen Lynch (8th district) about their opposing votes on Obama's plan to arm moderate Syrian rebels. Representative Lynch was one of two members of the Massachusetts Congressional delegation who voted in favor of Obama’s proposal, Congressman Capuano joined the rest of the delegation in voting against the request for authorization.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
4:32 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

The People's Climate March Isn't The Beginning Of The End, It's The End Of The Beginning

Protestors march in Manhattan in support of action against climate change on September 21.
Credit South Bend Voice / Flickr Creative Commons

Three hundred thousand protestors flooded the streets of Manhattan this past Sunday -- some brandishing signs saying "There Is No Planet B," others decked out in feathered hats and Lorax costumes,  but all in the name of climate change action.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
1:12 pm
Tue September 23, 2014

Education Sec. Matt Malone: 'I Can't Stand The 'Impossible' People -- I Am An Optimist'

Sec. Matt Malone speaking at City Year graduation in 2013. Malone joined Jim and Margery for Ask the Secretary.
Credit City Year / Flickr

Massachusetts Education Secretary Matt Malone joined Boston Public Radio to talk about visiting nearly 300 elementary and secondary schools, a trial run for a new statewide standardized test, and what kind of a start Massachusetts schools have had this year.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
8:56 am
Tue September 23, 2014

BPR: The Climate Summit, The Education Secretary, and This Old House

A handout picture released by the U.S. Navy shows the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) launching a Tomahawk cruise missile against Islamic State targets in Syria on Tuesday.
Credit Eric Garst / U.S. Navy via NPR
  •   CNN's John King discusses the Congressional vote to aid  Syrian rebels, and how the politics of the election factor in, as well as the UN Climate Summit in New York, and the ongoing rallies around the globe.
  • Congressman Michael Capuano and Stephen Lynch drop by to tell us why they voted for and agaisnt arming Syrian rebels.
  • Secretary of Education,
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
5:58 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

War, Politics, And Election Season

The Mehdi Army militia, shown here in Basra, is one of the groups the United States has entered an uneasy alliance with in its fight against the Islamic State.
Credit AFP/Getty Images via NPR

War, as the Prussian General Carl von Clausewitz once wrote, is "merely the continuation of politics by other means." But, as GroundTruth Project founder Charles Sennott explains, the process of selling war is just as political. 

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:05 pm
Mon September 22, 2014

Can Ray Rice And Adrian Peterson Redeem Themselves?

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell held a press conference Friday to address the way the league has handled player discipline issues.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Can disgraced NFL players redeem themselves?

Last Friday, Roger Goodell held a press conference to address problems with his players' off-field conduct. Goodell placed blame on himself for the way player punishments were handed out.

Critics of the NFL hold Goodell hasn't gone far enough in keeping players accused crimes off the field. While the league and its critics sort out appropriate punishments, it's harder to see — farther down the road — whether it's possible for players to redeem themselves.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
10:37 am
Mon September 22, 2014

BPR: Local, National, and International Politics, plus Miami Vice, and the NFL's Concussion Crisis

BPR: Monday September 22, 2014
Credit Jason DeCrow / AP via NPR
  • Charlie Sennott discusses ground troops in Iraq, the global discussion about security polices around kidnapped journalists, and the climate change march in New York.
  • John Nucci, Vice President of Government Relations and Community Affairs at Suffolk University, and a columnist for the Boston Herald, and Mike Astrue, former Commissioner
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
2:43 pm
Fri September 19, 2014

Emily's List: Casino Predictions For Massachusetts

Greater Boston and Beat the Press host Emily Rooney
Credit WGBH News

Greater Boston host Emily Rooney joined Jim Braude and Margery Eagan on Boston Public RadioRooney supplied another edition of "Emily's List," her weekly list of gripes, observations, predictions and ultimatums.

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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
9:12 am
Fri September 19, 2014

BPR: Madison Park, News Quiz, and Apples— Fruit and Phone

BPR: Madison Park, News Quiz, and Apples— Fruit and Phone
Credit Justin Sullivan / Getty Images via NPR
  • WGBH News' Callie Crossley, sits down with us to talk about the ongoing Madison Park story that seems to be slipping Under the Radar.
  • Food and environmental writer Rowan Jacobsen stops by to chat about his new book,  Apples of Uncommon Character.
  • And speaking of Apple, it's launch day. 
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BOSTON PUBLIC RADIO
3:58 pm
Thu September 18, 2014

The U.S. Is A Wine-Drinking Juggernaut

Wine sits in barrels at a winery in St. Helens, California. In 2013, the US became the biggest net consumer of wine in the world.
Credit https://www.flickr.com/photos/keokiseu/ / Flickr

It's official: the United States consumes more wine than France. In 2013, US customers bought more wine in total than French customers. While the French still retain the crown per capita, the announcement by the International Vine and Wine Association solidified Americans' place in the wine-drinking pantheon.

Boston Wine School founder Jonathon Alsop — author of Wine Lover's Devotional — talked about the milestone on WGBH's Boston Public Radio. Alsop put the news in perspective. "France [drinks] 46 liters a year, per person," Alsop said. "We [drink] 10 liters a year." So, per day, French citizens drink "one bottle a week. [Americans], one glass a week."

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